Actions

Articles

Fear

From WikiLove - The Encyclopedia of Love

{{#invoke:Template:also|main}}

Contents

English

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Middle English feer, fere, fer, from Old English {{ang|fǣr}}, {{ang|ġefǣr||calamity, sudden danger, peril, sudden attack, terrible sight}}, from Proto-Germanic {{gem-pro|*fērō}}, {{gem-pro|*fērą||danger}}, from Proto-Indo-European {{ine-pro|*per-||to attempt, try, research, risk}}. Cognate with [[gevaar#|gevaar]] (danger, risk, peril), [[Gefahr#|Gefahr]] (danger, risk, hazard), [[fara#|fara]] (danger, risk, peril), {{la|perīculum||danger, risk, trial}}, Albanian frikë (fear,danger),Romanian [[frică#|frică]] The verb is from Middle English feren, from Old English {{ang|fǣran||to frighten, raven}}, from the noun. Cognate with the archaic Dutch verb [[varen#|varen]] (to fear; to cause fear).

Noun

Fear (plural [[~#|~]])
  1. Template:Senseid
    Lëtzebuergesch: en
    A strong, uncontrollable, unpleasant emotion caused by actual or perceived danger or threat.
    Template:Ux
    • Template:Quote-book
    • Template:RQ:Vance Nobody
      Turning back, then, toward the basement staircase, she began to grope her way through blinding darkness, but had taken only a few uncertain steps when, of a sudden, she stopped short and for a little stood like a stricken thing, quite motionless save that she quaked to her very marrow in the grasp of a great and enervating fear.
    • Template:Quote-book
  2. Lëtzebuergesch: en
    A phobia, a sense of fear induced by something or someone.
    Template:Ux
    • Template:RQ:EHough PrqsPrc
      Serene, smiling, enigmatic, she faced him with no fear whatever showing in her dark eyes. The clear light of the bright autumn morning had no terrors for youth and health like hers.
  3. Lëtzebuergesch: en
    Extreme veneration or awe, as toward a supreme being or deity.
    • Bible, Jeremiah xxxii. 40:
      I will put my fear in their hearts.
    • Bible, Psalms xxxiv. 11
      I will teach you the fear of the Lord.
Synonyms
Derived terms
Translations
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Verb

Fear (third-person singular simple present [[Fears#|Fears]], present participle [[Fearing#|Fearing]], simple past and past participle [[Feared#|Feared]])
  1. Lëtzebuergesch: en
    To cause fear to; to frighten.
    • Template:RQ:Mlry MrtDrthr:
      Thenne the knyghte sayd to syre Gawayn / bynde thy wounde or thy blee chaunge / for thou bybledest al thy hors and thy fayre armes /.{{#invoke:String|rep| .|2}}/ For who someuer is hurte with this blade he shalle neuer be staunched of bledynge / Thenne ansuerd gawayn hit greueth me but lytyl / thy grete wordes shalle not feare me ne lasse my courage
    • William Shakespeare (1564-1616)
      Tush, tush! fear boys with bugs.
  2. Template:SenseidTemplate:Label To feel fear about (something); to be afraid of; to consider or expect with alarm.
    Template:Ux
    • William Shakespeare (1564-1616)
      I greatly fear my money is not safe.
    • Template:RQ:WBsnt IvryGt
      At twilight in the summer there is never anybody to fear—man, woman, or cat—in the chambers and at that hour the mice come out. They do not eat parchment or foolscap or red tape, but they eat the luncheon crumbs.
    • Template:Quote-magazine
  3. Lëtzebuergesch: en
    To venerate; to feel awe towards.
    Template:Ux
  4. Lëtzebuergesch: en
    Regret.
    Template:Ux
  5. Lëtzebuergesch: en
    To be anxious or solicitous for.
    • William Shakespeare (1564-1616)
      The sins of the father are to be laid upon the children, therefore.{{#invoke:String|rep| .|2}}I fear you.
  6. Lëtzebuergesch: en
    To suspect; to doubt.
Synonyms

Antonyms

Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English fere, feore, from Old English {{ang|fēre||able to go, fit for service}}, from Proto-Germanic {{gem-pro|*fōriz||passable}}, from Proto-Indo-European {{ine-pro|*per-||to put across, ferry}}. Cognate with Scots fere, feir (well, active, sound), Template:Gmh {{ Template:Gmh/script |[[gevüere#Template:Gmh|gevüere]]|face=term|lang=gmh}} (able, capable, fit, serviceable), [[för#|för]] (capable, able, stout), [[færr#|færr]] (able). Related to [[fare#|fare]].

Alternative forms

Adjective

Template:En-adj

  1. (Articlesdialectal) Able; capable; stout; strong; sound.
    hale and fear

Statistics

Anagrams


Irish

Pronunciation

  • [fʲaɾˠ]
  • (Connemara) [fʲæːɾˠ]

Etymology

From Template:Sga {{ Template:Sga/script |[[fer#Template:Sga|fer]]|face=term|lang=sga}}, from Template:Proto:cel-pro {{cel-pro|*wiros}}, from Proto-Indo-European {{ine-pro|*wiHrós}}. Cognate with Welsh [[gŵr#|gŵr]], Latin [[vir#|vir]], Old English wer.

Noun

Template:Ga-noun

  1. man
    Template:Ux
  2. husband, male spouse

Declension

Template:Ga-decl-m1

Mutation

Template:Ga mut cons


Scots

Noun

Template:Sco-noun

  1. fear

Verb

Template:Sco-verb

  1. to fear
  2. to frighten, scare

Scottish Gaelic

Pronunciation

  • /fɛɾ/

Noun

Template:Gd-noun

  1. man
  2. husband, male spouse

Declension

First declension; forms with the definite article:

Case Singular Plural
Nominative am fear na fir
Vocative fhir fhir
Genitive an fhir nam fear/fir
Dative leis an fhear leis na fir

Derived terms

See also

Pronoun

Fear (genitive Template:Slink)

  1. somebody, something, one

Usage notes

Derived terms


West Frisian

Noun

Template:Fy-noun

  1. ferry
  2. spring (mechanical device)

ar:fear an:fear az:fear ca:fear cs:fear cy:fear da:fear de:fear et:fear el:fear es:fear eo:fear eu:fear fr:fear ga:fear gd:fear ko:fear hy:fear hr:fear io:fear id:fear ie:fear it:fear kn:fear kk:fear sw:fear ku:fear lo:fear lv:fear lt:fear li:fear hu:fear mk:fear mg:fear ml:fear my:fear nl:fear ja:fear oc:fear pl:fear pt:fear ro:fear ru:fear sm:fear sa:fear simple:fear fi:fear sv:fear ta:fear te:fear th:fear chr:fear tr:fear uk:fear vi:fear zh:fear